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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but this is a grave moment for the country. we need to do something very big, very substantial to bring our long-term deficits down over time. we have to do that in a way that's good for the economy for more support because the economy is healing from the recession. it's going to require both sides to compromise. president's bringing leaders together again at the white house this evening to try to figure out how to move forward. >> what's he actually saying? because you're hearing boehner saying they're demanding tax increases, we're not going to do that. they've also said you were back pedaling a bit on whether to cut entitlement programs like medicare or social security. what's the fact? >> that latter thing is not true. the president is standing tough. he is willing to do very, very difficult things. >> like what? on medicare? >> like getting substantial savings from the budget, across the budget. defense, the rest of government, even medicare/medicaid over the long term, there are things we can do responsibly to save money in those programs and we have to do that to bring the deficits under
on the small town of grandby, colorado. >> the vehicle was going in and out of this, basically, a big concrete warehouse, that was made out of prefast concrete. and what he would do is fall forward until the wall would collapse on top of him an then he would pull backwards and he was just going from one end of the build to the other doing that, causing the building to collapse on itself. >> glen trainor is the former undersheriff of grand county, colorado. when the call first comes in that a bulldozer is on the loose, he isn't overly concerned. but that changes after a report of shots being fired. it turns out, this is no ordinary bulldozer. >> when i arrived on scene and walked around the corner and saw this big behemoth tank there that that was fully encased in armor, i knew that we there a problem that was much bigger than our team could handle on our own. >> the homemade tank is outfitted with high-caliber rifles and is rolling over everything in its path. a few residents grabbed cameras to record the destruction as it happens. >> mad man in grandby. >> the rural sheriff's department is il
in the city of ft. myers in a beautiful neighborhood. big house. so it would seem kind of an unlikely place for this sort of activity on one level. but when talking to the chief of police there, he had realized, from hearing from parents and teachers, that there was an issue in his town. we hire perverted justices as consultants for their expertise, being decoys, in the chat rooms. they really know what they're doing, and they have this down to a system. i'm always blown away by the hidden cameras. this stuff is really james bond type technology. in florida, we have a lot of cameras. something like 13. we even had one in a palm tree that could turn 360 degrees and could zoom into the license plate on a car at the other end of the street. >> he's coming around back. he is on the steps, opening the door. oh, he's just going to come right in. watch it, emily. he's in, heading towards the kitchen. he's in the kitchen. call out. >> hey! i'm in here! >> call again, call again. >> hey, i'm about to put on my bra and panties. come on in. >> good job. he's coming around the desk, heading towards chr
it something big? ...or something small? ...something old? ...or something new? ...or maybe, just maybe... it's something you haven't seen yet. the 2nd generation of intel core processors. stunning visuals, intelligent performance. this is visibly smart. >>> susan sutton was dead, shot five times by a killer who invaded her home after her birthday party. her husband, john, an attorney, had been shot in the head twice and was in critical condition at a miami hospital, undergoing multiple surgeries to save his life. but soon after the shooting, detectives had a potential suspect. john sutton's good friend and law partner. >> he had a partner who was on the scene when homicide detectives got there. >> teddy montoto told police he had been on the phone with susan, heard the unmistakable sound of gunfire, rushed over to the sutton house with a gun of his own to try to help, but was that the whole story? they gave montoto a polygraph. it showed he had been deceptive, hiding something. >> what we learned was that he was having an affair with mrs. sutton. >> so montoto hadn't been straight with them
that he, a man of humble roots, was able to provide his family with so much. the big house. the backyard pool. money for whatever they needed. >> once upon a time. >> reporter: the kind of son-in-law rosie's parents rocco and gigi dipuccio could regard as heaven sent. >> she sent him for two jars of baby food. he'd come home with 36. i mean everything he did had to be big and lots. >> reporter: was it in a show-off kind of way or was he just being generous? >> no. he was just -- you know, i used to say to him, i think yaz is so good to you in everything you do because you're so giving to people. >>> now, rose city, her family would say, could not have cared less about the house, the cars, the status. she was down to earth and content with what she always had, not the least of it, her close italian-american family, where sunday dinner at her parents was a don't miss. >> silly. where's your teeth, silly? >> and, of course, the sun and moon of her life, daughter and son. was she happy to be a mother? >> oh, my god. are you kidding? she would just pinch their cheek and say, i can't believe i
? >> the condoms. there you go. so you had a big night planned, huh? >> no. please listen to me. >> go ahead. got nothing but time. >> there's nothing, i swear. i don't want to do anything. you know. i don't want to hurt anyone. i just wanted to talk. i swear to you. you know -- >> how were you going to use the condoms in the conversation? >> i wasn't going to use them at all. >> you have them in your pocket. >> well, yeah, i do have -- >> were you going to do balloon tricks with them? >> no. >> well, come on. there's only one reason, typically, that people bring condoms to a home. >> yeah. >> and that's for protection during sex. >> yeah. >> there's only two people in this house as far as you know, you and the 15-year-old girl. so what am i to think about this? >> i have a family at home. i love them dearly. you know? >> you have kids? >> yes. >> how old are your kids? >> i have one daughter and two stepsons from my wife's previous marriage. >> so if your daughter was home alone and some guy who was 30 came to visit, you would feel how? >> i understand and sympathize. very upset. >> here is a gu
and they'd stop showing up. we had been to locations for investigations that were near big metropolitan areas. we wanted to find out if this was also a problem in america's heartland. so we went to darke county, ohio, right near greenville, ohio. i think the county's a population of something like 13,000. and we set up to see what would happen. by the time the investigation was over, we learned that even in this little town of ohio, this was a problem. >> put it down. put your hands in the air. >> hands in the air. >> turn around. >> turn around. >> i'm going to read you your rights. do you have any questions. >> you have the right to remain silent. anything that you say can and will be used against you in the court of law. >> take a seat. watch your head, okay? watch your head. >> in this case as in the previous investigations, we worked with computer watch dog group. perverted justice. its decoys go into chat rooms posing at 12, 13, 13, 14-year-old kids. home alone. open to the idea of a sexual liaison in a meeting. but they go into chat rooms and they just wait and they never make th
to have his little party. >> well, all that it sounds like you've got a pretty big night planned, huh? >> yep. >> so what was your plan? >> my plan? just to hang out. >> to hang out. >> hang out. >> uh-huh. >> hang out with whom. >> hang out with liz. >> how old is liz? >> 14, i think. >> and how old are you? >> 27? >> what do you do for a living? >> i'm actually looking for a job right now. i got laid off from my last job. >> and what is your degree in? >> my degree is in hospitality management. >> have you ever had a job in that field? >> mm-hmm. >> it's always hard for me to understand how somebody who, you know, makes it through college, gets to be in their mid-20s and has a good education, has the ability to get a good job, ends up just kind of lost and trolling the internet for young teens. >> do you see that there's something wrong with someone your age coming here to meet somebody who is 14? >> yes, sir. >> and what's wrong with that? >> um, it's against the law? >> against the law. and you knew that before you came over here? >> not really. >> but you know it now? >> mm-hmm.
. caylee accidentally drown and casey and her father george covered it up. >> the defense made a big promise in opening statement, saying that it's going to have to deliver on. and now they're going to have to prove an accident. if they can't, the jury is going to punish them for having made that promise. >> on june 16th, the third anniversary of the day that caylee anthony was last seen alive, the defense begins its case. >> in 2008 -- >> its first order of business, attacking the holes in the state forensic's evidence, namely what wasn't found. no blood or dna in the trunk of casey's car. >> there was no profile generated from those items. >> no chloroform found in the anthony home. >> did you find any containers that at one time or another contained chloroform? >> no, not at all. >> and the only dna found on the duct tape that the prosecution claims covered caylee's nose and mouth comes from an fbi analyst who handled it. >> did you later find out that the profile was yours. >> i did and it was. >> i think they've come to expect that it's going to be there. and they would say, see
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)